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HOME : Egyptian Antiquities : Egyptian Amulets : Openwork Wedjat Eye Amulet in a Frame
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Openwork Wedjat Eye Amulet in a Frame - CK.0211
Origin: Egypt
Circa: 16 th Century BC to 11 th Century BC
Dimensions: .625" (1.6cm) high x .875" (2.2cm) wide
Collection: Egyptian Antiquities
Medium: Faience

$1,200.00
Location: United States
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Description
The first examples of amulets appeared in Ancient Egypt as early as 4000 B.C. Believed to possess magical powers that protected the wearer or bestowed upon the properties they symbolized, amulets were worn both by the living as well as the dead. Throughout their evolution, talismans were crafted from a variety of materials including precious metals such as gold and silver, semiprecious stone like jasper and carnelian, as well as other more affordable glazed compositions such as faience. The particular powers of an individual amulet were based upon its specific shape, although the material and even the color of the charm could affect its magical abilities. While many of the amulets created to be worn by the living could also be worn after death, there also existed a specific group of charms that were made specifically to be placed upon the mummified remains of the deceased. All together, amulets represent an important class of Ancient Egyptian art that furthers our understanding of their complex religious beliefs.

The Ancient Egyptians believed the wedjat eye was the most powerful protection against evil. Ever-vigilant against bad luck and misfortune, the symbolic eye of the god Horus was worn by king and peasant alike. Though the eye was sometimes fashioned in gold and precious stones, it was thought to be at its most powerful when colored blue. The tradition of blue amulets guarding against harm is a very ancient one. Throughout the Mediterranean world today, one sees beads and talismans of bright blue, which are meant to avert the evil eye of bad luck. In Egypt, peasants dip the palm of their hands in blue paint and press their palms against the sides of their houses. When the Egyptian Empire was at its glorious height, this faience eye of the god Horus was worn by some long-forgotten person to bring good fortune and luck. Much has changed in the world since then, but the power of this talisman remains strong and benevolent as always. For millennia, mankind has found peace and solace in objects of significance. When cleansed and consecrated through ritual, such objects – be they gems, amulets, herbs, or written words – become talismans. A talisman is any item imbued with a specific power by its bearer to serve a specific intention. Ancient Egyptians used massive stone tablets as healing talismans while the Greeks and Romans used lead talismans to communicate with the spirit realm. Traditionally, a talisman acts to anchor energy in the physical plane. That energy may be protective in nature or may be intended to draw abundance, wealth, or a wide variety of blessings to its user. Today, a talisman may be made of wood, metal, paper, stone, or natural elements such as plants. Often, talismans are small enough to be easily worn or carried, and they may be marked with words or symbols that the talisman’s owner deems meaningful. Creating and owning a talisman can reassure you and also serve to aide you in attracting what you want in life. You may use your talisman to help you attain health, security, or good luck. Or you may simply want to carry an object with you that will remind you of your search for soulful tranquility. In order to create a talisman, you must first determine its physical properties. This can be as innocuous as a strip of paper bearing the word “Love” and carried in a wooden box or cloth sack. You may prefer a more visible talisman, such as a metal amulet or a gemstone worn as jewelry. Before your object becomes a talisman, however, it must be charged. This can be done by cleansing the object – with water or with incense – and holding a ritual of your own making. Or, you can leave the object in moonlight or sunlight or bury it in the earth for a time. To preserve its effectiveness, talismans should be reconsecrated regularly. Almost any object can be transformed into a talisman of protection, good fortune, health, love, or serenity. It may be strung on a cord and hung around the neck, worn on a belt, or carried in a purse or pocket. But the physical properties of the talisman are not as important as the intention of its bearer. If you are grounded in your desires, your talisman will give you a focal point that you can concentrate on to affirm your intention and help you achieve your goals. - (CK.0211)

 

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