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HOME : Islamic Art : AS Collection 4 : Glazed Dish Depicting a Cross-Legged Female Figure
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Glazed Dish Depicting a Cross-Legged Female Figure - LO.654
Origin: Iraq
Circa: 800 AD to 1000 AD
Dimensions: 2.1" (5.3cm) high x 6.3" (16.0cm) wide
Collection: Islamic Art
Medium: Earthenware


Additional Information: sold

Location: Great Britain
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Description
Small bowl painted in a monochrome brown, greenish lustre over an opaque white glaze. In the centre, a stylised depiction of a woman seated, “Indian style” with outstretched arms, in her left hand an object resembling a mirror, and in the right, a stylised flower. She is wearing round ear-rings, bracelets around her arms and her breasts are anatomically indicated. An inscription in Kufic script, which reads “blessing’, decorates the bottom of the ring foot. The polychrome luster painting technique was extremely short-lived, the monochrome variety becoming much more successful possibly because of it’s simplicity, since only one color was employed for the completion of a decorative pattern; it was monochrome luster painting that actually spread from Iraq to Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Syria and Iran. As it was customary in early lustreware, there is a narrow white margin around the central figure, while the rest of the surface is filled with a dotted background, recalling the ring-matted background of contemporary metalwork. A band of lunettes decorate the rim, while the exterior is filled with the customary crudely but charmingly rendered medallions spaced around the surface, filled with dots. This type of decoration is very characteristic in early monochrome lustre- painted ware from Iraq datable to the mid 10th century. An almost identical dish belongs to the Ashmolean Museum collection of Islamic Art, Oxford. For a comparable example see G. Fehervari, Ceramics of the Islamic World in the Tarek Rajab Museum, 2000: pl. 33, p. 46. - (LO.654)

 

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